last updated 08 October 2015 by Kevin Trethewey

The Spine model emerged from coaching and mentoring in teams that produce software. This means that many of the Practices and Tools relate directly to teams that work in the context of software development.

So what about teams that don’t build software? Is Spine Model still applicable?

Short answer

Yes, definitely. The model is applicable to any system of human relationships in general, and to human work systems in particular.

Longer Answer

In the context of human work systems one of the key constraints of software development is that it is mental labour, not manual labour. The fact that you are actually designing software only really matters at the Practices and Tools levels. At a Principle level, all mental labour will adhere to similar Principles. At a Values and Needs level it becomes less about the nature of the work and more the nature of humans.


last updated 08 October 2015 by Kevin Trethewey

The Spine model emerged from coaching and mentoring in teams that produce software. This means that many of the Practices and Tools relate directly to teams that work in the context of software development.

So what about teams that don’t build software? Is Spine Model still applicable?

Short answer

Yes, definitely. The model is applicable to any system of human relationships in general, and to human work systems in particular.

Longer Answer

In the context of human work systems one of the key constraints of software development is that it is mental labour, not manual labour. The fact that you are actually designing software only really matters at the Practices and Tools levels. At a Principle level, all mental labour will adhere to similar Principles. At a Values and Needs level it becomes less about the nature of the work and more the nature of humans.